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Faye Peterson, Gallup Throw Rug, Navajo Handwoven, 20 in x 37 in

  • Details
  • Collectibility
Artist:
Peterson, Faye
Tribal Affiliation:
Navajo
Age (circa date):
Circa 2010's
Height:
20
Width:
37
Rug Pattern:
Multi-Pattern
Rug Material (Amazon):
Wool
Style:
No
Attribute Keywords:
geometric-pattern
content of collectibility
Price:
$95.00

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Details

Gallup, NM has been associated with the railroad since its inception in the 1880s. It is named after a paymaster for the railroad, David Gallup, "let's go see Gallup to get our pay". In 1924 Gallup built its train depot that still stands today. That is when Gallup saw an increase in tourism and began spending lots of energy and effort to develop the Native American arts trade. Navajo weavings had already been introduced to the rest of America in the late 1800s and early 1900s by mail order catalogs. Not everyone wanted to spend the money for more expensive hand woven Navajo rugs so the Gallup Throw was introduced. This rug was different, it had a cotton warp and many times was left unfinished with fringes at one edge. Today the Gallup Throw is still be woven. However, it is now done mostly by Navajo women that are older and one day we probably wont see many of these weavings. It is lots of work for a piece of handmade art that doesn't demand a high price tag, and that is why it might not be carried on by the younger generation. We have a large selection of these great rugs and like the early 1920's Gallup we offer you the opportunity to take a little piece of Gallup home with you.
 

Navajo Weaving

The main Navajo weaving technique is classified as weft-faced tapestry. In this method discontinuous horizontal wefts go over and under vertical warps, completely concealing the warp threads.

Warp and weft are important because their coarseness or fineness, along with the skill of a weaver, determine the tightness of a weave. “Tightness” is what differentiates a loosely woven throw, a quality floor rug or museum tapestry. Tightness is defined by the number of weft threads per linear inch. The higher the weft counts, the tighter, finer and more expensive Navajo textiles will be.

You’ll find the lowest weft counts in coarsely woven Gallup Throws, approximately 12-16 threads per inch and the highest, 80-120, in superior Two Grey Hills/Toadlena weaves. The vast majority of Navajo textiles fall somewhere in between. These mid-range weavings have average counts of 30-60 wefts per inch. Textiles in this group are considered well woven, reasonably tight and ably crafted for long lasting wear and beauty.

To determine the weft count of a textile, place a ruler parallel to a vertical warp. With the aid of a magnifying glass count the number of weft threads in one inch. (Double that number to take into account the corresponding wefts on the back face.) Repeat this process in a number of areas since weft counts may vary with the different yarns in a pattern. Average the counts when you’re through. This gives you a good assessment of your piece.

Be aware that the tighter a weaver pounds down the wefts with her comb, and the finer her wool is spun, the higher the weft count will be. Keep in mind too, that the ratio between warp and weft is also important, with the finest textiles having both high warp and weft counts.

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